Cold Brew vs Iced Pour Over

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By: Gabe Venegas

Wholesale Account Manager and Coffee Educator, Kean Coffee

With summer rapidly approaching, we thought It would be fun to bring up the never-ending battle between Cold Brew vs Iced Pour Over. For this article, we’re not going to tell you which one is better than the other because, at the end of the day, coffee is all about flavor preference. Our main objective is to point you in the right direction depending on how you would like to enjoy your coffee and highlight what each brew method brings to the table… literally!

Cold Brew

toddyThe increasingly popular cold brew has been popping up everywhere from grocery stores, vending machines, and even gas stations. So, what’s all the hype? Why are people flocking to this beverage? To answer these questions, let us dive into what cold brew and how it works.

Cold brew is made using coarse ground coffee and adding either cold or room temperature water and steeping between 12 to 24 hours or using a slow drip process. Cold Brewing devices include the Toddy brewer, Filtron, the Kyoto Drip Tower, Yama Drip Tower, a French Press, or a mason jar (see our retail shelves at Kean Coffee to purchase some of these devices for home use). Unlike regular coffee, cold brew uses time rather than heat for extraction. The result is a very smooth and rich beverage with a heavier mouthfeel, syrupy flavor notes, and low acidity. Because cold brew steeps in water for an extended period of time, it makes it the easiest of all brewing methods and requires no technical skills. If you have fresh coarse ground coffee, good quality water (either bottled, filtered, or reverse osmosis), and a vessel, you can make an amazing cold brew. Additionally, cold brew can last up to two weeks when refrigerated, it can yield many cups, great for gatherings or parties, and it can be easily adjusted to strengthen to preference.

Due to its unique flavor characteristics, cold brew coffee can be used in a variety of ways and has the adaptability to serve many functions. As a concentrate, it can be used as a base for blended drinks. It also can be used to make coffee cocktails, and it can be zapped in the microwave to make it a hot coffee without the bright acidity for those who want a rich and syrupy cup. Lastly, if adding cream and sugar to your coffee is your thing, then cold brew is the way to go. Due to its process of mellowing out the acidity and highlighting the body and sweetness, cold brew is perfect for mixing with dairy as they complement one another.

Iced Pour Over (AKA Japanese Iced Method or Flash Brew)

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Now let’s talk about what an Iced Pour Over is and how it differs from cold brew. What’s the difference between the two and why choose one over the other? Like we mentioned earlier, flavor preference is a deciding factor to choosing one over the other. However, there are other variables involved that can help you choose what’s best for you.

Iced Pour Overs take only a few minutes to brew and have a brighter flavor than you’d expect from a summer coffee drink. It can be made with several types of manual brewers such as a Chemex, Hario V60 Fretta, or AeroPress (see our coffeehouse retail selection to purchase these brewers). Instead of using only hot water, half the water is already in the pot in the form of ice. This method has the advantages that come with hot brewing, but is instantly chilled as the coffee drips onto the ice, thus giving it its explosion of aromatics in the cup. An Iced Pour Over tends to be fruitier, sweet, crisp, delicate, and not heavy. It is best to enjoy immediately after brewing since it does not last due to the ice cubes. Once the ice melts, your brew will be diluted. This is a great method of brewing if you want something fast and only for yourself or two people. In addition, an Iced Pour Over does not go well with milk since it is a brighter cup with more acidity and less body; adding dairy can overpower the coffee or even make it taste sour.

Opposite of the simple cold brew method, an Iced Pour Over is much more complex and requires a bit more technique. If you can bear with us for a bit, we’d like to touch a little on how this happens. To fully understand Iced Pour Overs, you need to understand solubility, volatility, and oxidation. Let’s talk science!

Solubility

Solubility, in our case, is coffee’s ability to dissolve in water. Coffee grounds release soluble solids or particles that give taste and aromatics of the coffee, thus creating what we know as brewed coffee. Generally, particles are more soluble at higher temperatures and less soluble at lower temperatures. When we brew coffee, we use hot water between 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit to dissolve the coffee solids out of the coffee grounds and into the water.  When using cold water, coffee will dissolve slowly and incompletely; many of the soluble substances in coffee won’t make it out of the grounds and into the water.

Volatility

Volatility is the ability of substances to vaporize.  Volatile activity also increases with temperature: that’s why hot coffee is so aromatic.  Problem is, when you’re smelling coffee, it’s losing its aromatics to the air.  When brewing coffee hot and then cooled quickly, the volatility of coffee escapes into the air caused by the hot water, but is instead of being lost for good, it is recaptured by the ice cubes when it begins to cool.

Oxidation

Oxidation leads to rancidity. When oxygen messes with oils, it makes them turn rancid, causing them to taste bad.  For example, the taste of an unclean coffee urn is caused by oxidized coffee oils.  Coffee kept warm takes on these same flavors, since oxidation happens much more quickly at high temperatures.  This is another reason why cooling coffee quickly after brewing is essential.

In a nut shell, Iced Pour Overs work in the following manner: To fully extract flavor, it is brewed hot. To lock in aromatics and prevent off-flavors, it is cooled instantly.

Now that we have covered both brewing methods, here’s a breakdown of a pros and cons list to help you decide once and for all what method you might prefer:

Cold Brew

Iced Pour Overs

Pros Cons Pros Cons
Anyone can do it Takes a long time to make Takes only a few minutes Requires technique (not to worry, we’ll gladly teach you)
Serves more than 1 person Brews only in large quantities (you can’t brew for a single person, but you can serve yourself one cup) Serves only 1-2 people (if you don’t want to share) Serves only 1-2 people (if you want to serve more people)
Lasts for up to 2 weeks Enjoy immediately Can’t store for later
Goes well with or without milk Does not go well with milk (for people who prefer black coffee)
Requires little brewing equipment (less expensive) Requires more brewing equipment (for the brewing gear junkies) More expensive

Tasting Notes

Tasting Notes

·   Low acidity (not bright) ·  Highlights acidity (tends to be        brighter)
·   Smooth and rich body ·   Crisp and lighter body
·   Heavier mouthfeel ·   Lighter mouthfeel
·   Simple and straightforward ·   Delicate and complex

We hope you have been intrigued by our coffee comparisons and we wish you an awesome caffeinated summer time! Please feel free to share your personal opinions and preferences for Cold Brew vs. Iced Pour Over in the comments 🙂

Adventures in Coffee Growing – by Martin Diedrich

Sunday morning coffee harvest today. I picked coffee from just one specific tree, a Garnica Arabica variety.Coffee_picking-6-15-1 We have about 14 different Arabica varieties growing on our small Costa Mesa coffee farm. The Garnica tree was full of ripe, sweet fruit, of which the seed is the bean one makes coffee from.

The Garnica variety is a hybrid that was developed in Jalapa, Veracruz, Mexico in the 1960’s. That region is now the only place it grows commercially.

Our Garnica tree was heavy with coffee cherries
Our Garnica tree was heavy with coffee cherries

We are told it is a hybrid of Arabica varieties, Mundo Novo, and Caturra. Its fruit is particularly sweet, which inspired me to do an isolation on it so that in about four to six weeks when it’s ready I can roast and cup the results to see exactly what the Garnica tastes like. The coffee needed to come off the tree anyway, because the tree is setting up for a massive flowering to produce next year’s crop. One wants to have the tree able to focus it’s energy on the next crop, not the previous. In the meantime, this morning’s three pound picking yield is now fermenting. In about 48 hours I will wash it, then sun dry it for a week. Another two weeks of resting, then it will be ready for roasting and cupping. More later………..

I was able to harvest 3 lbs. of cherries from this tree today
I was able to harvest 3 lbs. of cherries from this tree today
I de-pulped the coffee beans and now they will ferment
I de-pulped the coffee beans and now they will ferment

TED’S ADVENTURES IN AFRICA

Our head roaster Ted Vautrinot represented Kean Coffee in Rwanda this summer as a judge for the Rwanda Cup of Excellence competition. Below is a preview of his travel blog, which will be published in it’s entirety very soon.

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I stepped off the plane onto the rolling aluminum stairway straight out of 1969 and was enveloped by the close, wet heat of Central Africa. It was 7pm and it still felt like we’d walked into a hot, damp, wool blanket. I was grateful for the conversation of my friends and fellow cuppers Thomas and Anika as we waited in the interminable line to get our passports stamped with “Kigali, Rwanda”.  This was my first trip to Africa, and I was excited and apprehensive about the possibilities of finding great coffees and a new adventure in a strange land. I’ve participated in Cup of Excellence (COE) competitions before, and I’d worked with the Head Judge Sherri Johns before, I knew the cupping would be professional and organized. This was a new continent, though- a new people, a new language… In some ways I would be starting from scratch to find my African origin experience.

We climbed into a van the next morning to travel from Kigali to Rwamagana under leaden skies to join the rest of the cuppers and staff that were assembled at the lab there. Rwanda’s geography and the season kept the countryside perpetually shrouded in a light mist for most of our stay. As we drove the two hours to the lab I was struck by two things: First, the country was completely clean- there wasn’t a speck of the litter in the markets or on the roadside that is common throughout Central America. Second, most every man, woman, or child walking along the roadside were carrying a yellow five-gallon plastic jerry can to transport water from a clean source to their home- sometimes as far as 3 miles in one direction. Despite the hardship conditions they live under, Rwandans take an immense pride in their land, their country.

I was pleased to find that Sherri had, true to form, prepared the lab and the staff impeccably. Sherri and Martin Diedrich have a long professional history- Sherri helped Martin create the menu and recipes we’ve used at Kean Coffee since the beginning. Sherri and the 20 Rwanda National cuppers had slogged through the hundreds of submitted samples and passed the top 60 to us, the International Jury. We would spend the next 5 days calibrating and then winnowing the field down to the top 10 coffee Rwanda has to offer for this year. We would have to be consistent and exacting on every round to give each coffee its fair shot. For every round of 10 coffees, four examples of each coffee are precisely weighed and ground and placed on each table. The judges score on fragrance, taste, acidity, body, complexity, finish, and uniformity. The presence of mind to keep track of all the subtle differences of 40 cups of coffee as they are changing and cooling is daunting and takes practice. Alongside our 20 International Judges were 8 observers who were learning and honing their judging skills. We cupped and compared scores against each other and the National Jury, who had stayed on to support our efforts by preparing, roasting, and cataloguing our rounds. Sherri and I also got to introduce the Rwandan cuppers to coffees of the world. I had brought Kean Coffee production roasts of Guatemala, Ethiopia, Sumatra, and Hawaii coffees with me and we set up a cupping for the national jury. None of these Rwanda experts had ever tasted a coffee from outside their own country; it was all a brand new experience. Not surprisingly, the cuppers had an easier time with the African coffee. It was great fun to watch their eyes grow wide and question marks fill their expressions as they tasted the Guatemala and Sumatra coffees- so very different from what they’d ever tasted before- and then tell them these were 90 plus examples of those region’s coffees. 

By the end of the day our taste buds were ndarushye (tired), and we climbed aboard the bus for the short trip to the local hotel. We were being treated very well indeed, for our hotel had electricity more than half the time, and often had hot water in the rooms. In the soft night air we caught up and traded coffee and travel stories over dinner in the bar while the Kenyan soap opera (in English, no less) played out on the TV in the background. We had come from Japan, Korea, Germany, Russia, Great Britain, Australia, Finland, and the US to share our love of truly exceptional coffee here in the heart of Africa.

The next three days we worked in earnest as we scored the coffees to decide which would move to the final rounds. The power had been intermittent at the lab, and the backup generator failed, so the staff had lost some roasts and were running behind. Over the week they consistently worked 14-18 hour days keeping the samples in order for us to evaluate them fairly. The three Rwanda flavor profiles became clear; a rich, jammy, creamy profile; a soft tea-rose aromatic profile; and a spicy cedar, hazelnut profile.  Rwanda coffee has come a long way in the last 20 years as more and more care is given to the cultivation and harvesting of the country’s second biggest export crop (after bananas). We kept our noses to the grindstone and narrowed the field to the ten coffees we would rate as the best this year. Taking our “ibiryo” or meals with the staff we got to learn a little of the language and about their lives over rice, potatoes, beans, baked bananas, yucca, and every other starch imaginable along with a hint of greens and a sliver of protein.  On one afternoon we got to visit some producing farms on the shore of Lake Kivu. The next afternoon we were allowed a special visit to the genocide memorial in Kigali, a moving and sobering reminder of the events that have shaped this culture.

Our final round was the ten finest coffees from the first three days of cupping, and we tucked into them with focus and gusto. Each were coffees I’d be proud to bring back to my family and friends. Comparing notes afterwards I was also pleased to see that my scoring was well-calibrated with the national cuppers. I had learned more in this week about the details of Rwanda coffee than in the previous two years in our lab, from the sheer volume of coffees and the expert help. We celebrated over dinner that night with our National staff, and the Governor of the Eastern Province showed her support by joining us. Afterwards we shared the Rwanda love of dance as the DJ played African Hip-Hop and Dance tunes and the umuhungu and umukobwa (boys and girls) slipped easily in and out of groups. No couples, just groups of dancers joining and splitting- migrating across the floor as the beats seeped through us and gently pushed us around.

Next morning we headed back through Kigali and then north to Byumba for the Awards ceremony. We had seen a few commercials on national TV about COE, and even saw billboards in Kigali, but we weren’t prepared for the throngs of people who had walked miles into the countryside to the site of the awards. The huge grassy field was ringed on all sides with thousands of local farmers and their families, visiting dignitaries, and government officials while a traditional dance troupe performed and sang. Each dignitary was compelled to give a speech, but the only Kinyarwanda I understood from them was the occasional “Ikawa nziza” or excellent coffee. A poet performed her piece about the life of a coffee plant using the analogy of a woman growing up and maturing, and though I barely understood a word of the Kinyarwanda I could connect with the passion and humor in her soul about this plant and what it means to these people. As the awards were presented the crowd’s applause grew with each winner, culminating with the first place award while the Governor and dignitaries jostled each other to make sure they each got into the winner’s photos. I was filled with joy and pride to see so many people taking the quality of their land and their work so much to heart. After the ceremony we exchanged our murakoze’s (thank you) and murabeho’s (goodbye) with our new friends and headed on uragende amahoro (peaceful journey) back to Kigali.

Next found me on a flight from Kigali to Moshi, Tanzania at the base of Mount Kilimanjaro. Because of Martin’s long relationships with producers and exporters around the world I was hosted by Sustainable Harvest and their satellite office in Tanzania. Boss Farijallah picked me up at the crisply modern airport (every tourist that visits Kilimanjaro passes through Moshi) and got me settled into town. Boss is an agronomist and engineer, and a fine cupper. Over a curry dinner we swapped stories and Boss filled me in on Sustainable Harvest’s work in Tanzania. Kean Coffee has bought coffee through the Portland, Oregon-based company before, so I was keen to see their operations on the ground. Sustainable’s mission is to provide low and high technology to the coffee farmers so they can produce higher quality for better prices. They also help develop secondary crops, like mushrooms, for the families’ consumption and for sale at market. The concept is to make coffee farming viable and profitable for the farmer so they can continue to produce generation after generation and provide a good life for their families.

Next morning Boss picked me up and we headed to Kilicafe’s offices in Moshi. Kilicafe supports and markets different cooperatives throughout Tanzania and works with Sustainable Harvest bringing green coffee to the international market. We met Lazaro Haonga there and talked about the challenges they face- shrinking yields as some trees approach 80 years of production, water conservation, declining interest in coffee by the next generation. Then we got to the nitty gritty and cupped a round of coffees in Kilicafe’s lab. Of the eight coffees we cupped at Kilicafe and the subsequent six later at Sustainable’s lab the three of us were never more than a point apart. This will be valuable as we continue to ask these groups to send us samples of 86 points and above, as we are clearly calibrated and agree and the ratings of different grades of coffee. Kean Coffee can focus on the high-quality samples we’re looking for and they can save their money and resources by offering their lower grade coffee to other buyers. Later that afternoon I got to meet with Sustainable’s Director in Tanzania, Rocio Diaz-Agero, and Boss and hear the details on the programs they’re implementing on the ground, like rainwater harvesting, natural compost and fertilizers, and battery-operated mobile cupping kits.

Next morning seven of us squeezed into the Land rover and headed out to visit some producers. The first cooperative was Sing’isi, about 60 kilometers west of Moshi. Like most Tanzania cooperatives, Sing’isi is a collective of about 500 holder/farmers some might have a few dozen trees, others a hundred. During the harvest they all bring their ripe cherry to the washing station where it’s pulped and then dried on raised beds. Sustainable has been helping them with water conservation and mushroom farming. They continue to work on raising quality with healthy new stock and better harvesting techniques. In a few years they might raise their coffee to the level that Kean buys. I explained our operation and the kind of coffees we deal with, and the level of quality our customers are accustomed to. We shared ladha (tasty) boxed lunches, and afterward shared music on a guitar I’d brought with me, trading songs and licks with a local farmer who also played. At the end of our jam I donated the guitar to the cooperative on behalf of Kean and Sustainable Harvest. The Mill manager, cooperative President, and guitar player/farmer were all grateful and touched, saying “Asante sana’’ (thank you very much). I hoped aloud that when they played and sang they’d think of the people far away drinking their coffee. We pressed on to Arusha, to a smaller cooperative called Mlimani Ngarashi. The Manager, an imposing woman named Mary, made us karibu (welcome) and showed us the operation. The 256 farmers in this group often take their ripe cherry to different stations depending on the price, so they struggle with consistency. They’ve just begun tracking each incoming lot by laptop computer so they can start to identify which farmers are producing truly high-quality coffee. A few photos and handshakes with the farmers that were there (mostly women) and we were twende (on our way).

I had let Boss know I wanted to see the animals of Tanzania, and he had reached out to some friends and arranged a guide to Ngoro Ngoro. I spent that night in Arusha and went down to the lobby the next morning at six to be on our way (twende).  John Neunguru is a slight, soft-spoken young man who’s been guiding msanga (gringos) through eastern Africa since he graduated Tourism College. His wife’s family has coffee holdings in the Bunga district in the south. On the two and a half hour drive to the National Preserve we talked of family and life, and he was happy to help me with my Swahili (two languages in 8 days). It was just the two of us in the old Toyota Land Cruiser winding through the long desert flatland past the thatched Masai huts and finally through Mto Wa Mbu (mosquito town- on the river) before starting the long climb to the crater’s rim. We stopped at the park entrance to check in (no one stays after dark- if you’re late getting back they’ll come hunt you down and bring you in) and pay the fees, then pressed on to the crater’s rim. Once a volcanic mountain, the eruption and lava flow deflated the area and created a disk in the earth 14 miles across surrounded on all sides by 1500 feet of mountain walls. On that disk hundreds of thousands of animals live year-round grazing on the grass and drinking from the streams fed by a year-round lake, a huge flamingo hatchery. Lions prowl and feed in the evenings, keeping the herbivore population thinned.  Each day scores of Land Rovers filled with msangas and Tanzanians descend into the crater to see the magnificence. Standing on the rim we looked down and I could see the waves of tiny dots moving across the plain, far too many to count. We dropped into the crater and passed huge herds of wildebeest and zebra calmly interspersed and munching together. Lions sunned themselves in the tall grass, biding their time until the dusk hunting hour. Elephants strode by on their way to leafier trees on the lake’s far shore, while hippos snoozed submerged until their moonlight feeding time. John pointed out each animal and explained their habits, even the Kites (raptor birds) that have learned to dive-bomb and steal the tourist’s lunch boxes. We passed warthogs, ostriches, jackals, gazelle, and bison on our journey across the crater, often just a few feet away. By late afternoon we were climbing the far side of the crater on our way out, then down again to Mto wa Mbu, and Arusha.

Next morning at 5:30 John collected me and from Kilimanjaro airport I began the 36 hour journey on six different planes home. I had ample time to reflect on the people and the land that give birth to and sustain the green coffee that I get to work with every day, and mostly on the character and heart of the people who cultivate and harvest this tiny green seed that’s become an indispensable part of our daily life so many thousands of miles away. I often see their smiles in my mind’s eye as I’m sipping the coffee that is a part of both our lives.

Meet the Barista: Ten Questions with GARRETT O’CONNOR

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Garrett O’Connor

This is an ongoing series in which you will get to know a little bit more about the fine young men and women who prepare your coffee at Kean Coffee through a set of random interview questions. Garrett O’Connor has been part of the team at Kean Coffee Newport for a little under a year. Garrett loves working with people and honing his craft as a barista. He is multi-talented, multi-faceted, and witty. If he doesn’t pursue a career as a stand-up comic, he will certainly entertain those around him despite it. Garrett can always be counted on for a smile. That’s why we love Garrett!

KC:  What do you like best about being a barista?

GO: The cute girls that come in. Also when I manage to make a really good latte art and people take pictures of it.

KC:  What is your favorite coffee drink?

GO: Italian cappuccino, Napoli style

KC:  What is your favorite thing to do on a Saturday (when you have the day off)?

GO: Sleep, or go to an Anaheim Ducks game..

KC: What was your favorite toy as a child?

GO: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

KC:  What is a fun fact that most people do not know about you?

GO: I like to sing in the shower.

KC: What was your favorite Halloween costume ever?

GO: Going as myself when I went to a uniformed private school. I thought it was a clever exploit.

KC: What was your least favorite costume ever?

GO: There are no bad costumes when you get free candy.

KC:  Who was your idol when you were a kid, and why?

GO: Martin Diedrich, pretty self-explanatory. He still is my idol.

KC:  If you had to enter a cooking contest and prepare your best entrée or dessert to impress the judges, what would you make?

GO: Lemon glazed seared halibut with garlic risotto and Bananas Foster (I make the best!)

KC: What was your favorite movie of all time, and why?

GO: Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. It’s pretty epic.

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KC: Thanks Garrett!

Meet the Barista: Eight Questions with MEGAN HERRERA

This is an ongoing series in which you will get to know a little bit more about the fine young men and women who prepare your coffee at Kean Coffee through a series of random interview questions. Megan Herrera has been a valuable part of our Kean Tustin team for over two years. Megan’s love for basketball helps her shine as a barista as she applies her multi-tasking, fast-paced, high energy maneuvers on the court to our fast-paced coffeehouse environment. At Kean Coffee just as on the court, Megan is small but mighty. That’s why we love Megan! 

Megan Herrera of Kean Tustin

KC:  What do you like best about being a barista?

MH: Making the perfect drink for the customers and making them happy, knowing I’m doing my best.  

KC:  What is your favorite coffee drink?

MH: Caffe Napoli

KC:  What is your favorite thing to do on a Saturday (when you have the day off)?

MH: Play video games, play basketball.

KC: What was your favorite toy as a child?

MH: My Woody doll from Toy Story.

KC:  What is a fun fact that most people do not know about you?

MH: I want to become a vampire.

KC: What were your favorite and least favorite Halloween costumes ever?

MH: Favorite: Max from “Where the Wild Things Are”. Least favorite: I was a baby.

KC: Name one of your personal skills or traits that you are most proud of.

MH: My humor. I’m the funniest person around. Really.

KC:  Who was your idol when you were a kid, and why?

MH: Kobe Bryant because I wanted to be as good as him at basketball.

KC: Thanks Megan!

Recognize this guy? Meet Dwayne Carroll!

At Kean Coffee we love our regulars – our guests who come in so frequently and regularly, sometimes spanning many years, that we learn their names and they learn ours, often becoming good friends with our staff members. We value their input and enjoy learning more about them and hearing their stories. Meet Dwayne Carroll, a beloved regular at Kean Newport and Tustin! 

Dwayne chillaxin’ at Newport with the pooch

My first cup of Martin’s coffee was when the Diedrich Coffee opened at Marguerite Pkwy and Crown Valley in Mission Viejo. I was there on opening day. I remember the first manager – a very nice lady, however I can’t remember her name. This shop was always a meeting place for the neighborhood, and always full of young people from Saddleback college being so nearby, always a happening place.

When I heard that Martin would be opening Kean Coffee, I felt it was a blessing even if it meant driving all the way to Newport Beach. Then when the people of Tustin where able to talk Martin into taking over the original Diedrich location on Newport Ave. and he opened a second Kean Coffee there, it was even closer for me, as I live in Mission Viejo. I was thrilled.

I go to Kean Coffee about five times a week, either location. Both are excellent for coffee, and a great staff that promote the quality product. As for me black coffee is my favorite. The best thing about Kean is the coffee, and having met so great people. Our dog is always treated well, with water bowls and tie down rings so you can go in and place an order. The other great experience was meeting my very best friend at Diedrich Coffee when he was going to Saddleback College as a student. Then when he graduated from there he went to Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo for two years. Then on to UCI in Irvine to get his Masters. Now he works for Oracle, a success story. When he is in town we now take a drive to Kean Coffee, like old times.

Dwayne Carroll – Mission Viejo, California

Are you a Kean Coffee regular? If you would like to tell us your story and be featured in a future blog post, please let us know by emailing blog@keancoffee.com! 

Meet the Barista: Eight Questions with MANUEL RODRIGUEZ

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Manny Rodriguez- out standing in his field

This is an ongoing series in which you will get to know a little bit more about the fine young men and women who prepare your coffee at Kean Coffee through a set of random interview questions. Manuel “Manny” Rodriguez has been with Kean Coffee for two years, as a barista in our Newport coffeehouse. In addition to being an awesome barista, Manny is a high achieving college student who aspires to become a teacher. Whatever he is doing, Manny works hard and always strives for excellence, while at the same time keeping a great attitude. That’s why we love Manny!

KC:  What do you like best about being a barista?

MR: The best thing about being a Kean barista is crafting every single drink from scratch using world class ingredients to make drinks of great quality and taste our customers can experience.

KC:  What is your favorite coffee drink?

MR: Turkish latte is my favorite drink with no doubt. I love the taste of espresso, cane syrup and cardamom in the same drink.

KC:  What is your favorite thing to do on a Saturday (when you have the day off)?

MR: It has been a while since I had a Saturday off. However, on a typical Saturday afternoon I go to the gym, read my Bible, and watch sports among other things.

KC:  If you could travel to any place in the world, where would you go?

MR: If I could travel to any place in the world I would go Egypt.  Egypt’s history of pharaohs and archeology have always fascinated me.

KC:  What is a fun fact that most people do not know about you?

MR: Most people do not know I have a great sense of humor.

KC:  Name one of your personal traits or skills that you are most proud of.

MR: I am a good listener.

KC:  Who was your idol when you were a kid, and why?

MR: My idol has always been my grandmother. She raised me and taught me values such as respect, kindness and selflessness just to mention a few.

KC:  If you had to enter a cooking contest and prepare your best entrée or dessert to impress the judges, what would you make?

MR: To impress the judges I would make chocolate-covered marshmallows topped with shredded coconut.

KC: Thanks Manny!

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Latte art by Manny of Kean Coffee